Author Topic: What high heels say about the massive gap between the rich and the poor  (Read 1008 times)

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What high heels say about the massive gap between the rich and the poor



Are the choices we make in our daily lives a result of our own innate desires, or a lemminglike drive to fit in?

When it comes to what to wear, people’s decisions are usually a mix of both. Fashion is undeniably about staying on trend and in step with those around you. But for many people, it’s also about expressing their own preferences and individuality.

Fashion may seem like a trivial subject, but Jeff Galak, a professor at Carnegie Mellon University’s Tepper School of Business, says that it provides an excellent measure for examining how people are influenced by those around them, and the lengths to which people go to conform. After all, Americans spend a huge amount of time and billions of dollars each year to keep up to date with fashions.

In a recent paper, Galak and three co-authors seek to examine how social conformity works by looking at one aspect of fashion that they can easily quantify: the height of women’s shoes. The researchers examine the height of shoes that more than 1,800 women purchased at an online luxury clothing retailer across America.

In particular, they look at women who move from one location to another in the United States, and analyze whether the height of the shoes they bought changed after they moved to be more similar to what women in their new area were purchasing. In total, they tracked nearly 15,000 shoe orders made over almost five years.

Pasr psychological studies have shown that the urge toward conformity is so powerful as to almost be irresistible. And Galak and his co-authors found that people who moved tended to demonstrate some tendency toward conformity, changing the height of the heels they purchased to be more in line with the purchases that people in their new homes were making.

But there was a crucial difference: That tendency to conform differed depending on the wealth of the places that the women were coming from, and the wealth of the places they were moving to. People conformed much more when they moved to a place with higher socioeconomic status, as the chart below shows. It didn't matter whether heels were higher or lower in the higher-class destination — in fact, they were about evenly split on that measure, Galak says.


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Offline behria

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Re: What high heels say about the massive gap between the rich and the poor
« Reply #1 on: September 24, 2016, 06:38:11 pm »
WoW! That's an amazing economic mind fuck. Please tell us more about how small numbers add up to make large numbers.







What high heels and other shit say about the massive gap between the rich and the poor

Are the choices we make in our daily lives a result of our own innate desires, or a lemminglike drive to fit in?

When it comes to what to wear, people’s decisions are usually a mix of both. Fashion is undeniably about staying on trend and in step with those around you. But for many people, it’s also about expressing their own preferences and individuality.

Fashion may seem like a trivial subject, but Jeff Galak, a professor at Carnegie Mellon University’s Tepper School of Business, says that it provides an excellent measure for examining how people are influenced by those around them, and the lengths to which people go to conform. After all, Americans spend a huge amount of time and billions of dollars each year to keep up to date with fashions.

In a recent paper, Galak and three co-authors seek to examine how social conformity works by looking at one aspect of fashion that they can easily quantify: the height of women’s shoes. The researchers examine the height of shoes that more than 1,800 women purchased at an online luxury clothing retailer across America.

In particular, they look at women who move from one location to another in the United States, and analyze whether the height of the shoes they bought changed after they moved to be more similar to what women in their new area were purchasing. In total, they tracked nearly 15,000 shoe orders made over almost five years.

Pasr psychological studies have shown that the urge toward conformity is so powerful as to almost be irresistible. And Galak and his co-authors found that people who moved tended to demonstrate some tendency toward conformity, changing the height of the heels they purchased to be more in line with the purchases that people in their new homes were making.

But there was a crucial difference: That tendency to conform differed depending on the wealth of the places that the women were coming from, and the wealth of the places they were moving to. People conformed much more when they moved to a place with higher socioeconomic status, as the chart below shows. It didn't matter whether heels were higher or lower in the higher-class destination — in fact, they were about evenly split on that measure, Galak says.



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Re: What high heels say about the massive gap between the rich and the poor
« Reply #1 on: September 24, 2016, 06:38:11 pm »

Offline behria

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Re: What high heels say about the massive gap between the rich and the poor
« Reply #2 on: September 24, 2016, 08:52:05 pm »
Come on, don't make me wait. Teach me more about economics.



What high heels and other shit say about the massive gap between the rich and the poor

[img[/img]http://Are the choices we make in our daily lives a result of our own innate desires, or a lemminglike drive to fit in?

When it comes to what to wear, people’s decisions are usually a mix of both. Fashion is undeniably about staying on trend and in step with those around you. But for many people, it’s also about expressing their own preferences and individuality.

Fashion may seem like a trivial subject, but Jeff Galak, a professor at Carnegie Mellon University’s Tepper School of Business, says that it provides an excellent measure for examining how people are influenced by those around them, and the lengths to which people go to conform. After all, Americans spend a huge amount of time and billions of dollars each year to keep up to date with fashions.

In a recent paper, Galak and three co-authors seek to examine how social conformity works by looking at one aspect of fashion that they can easily quantify: the height of women’s shoes. The researchers examine the height of shoes that more than 1,800 women purchased at an online luxury clothing retailer across America.

In particular, they look at women who move from one location to another in the United States, and analyze whether the height of the shoes they bought changed after they moved to be more similar to what women in their new area were purchasing. In total, they tracked nearly 15,000 shoe orders made over almost five years.

Pasr psychological studies have shown that the urge toward conformity is so powerful as to almost be irresistible. And Galak and his co-authors found that people who moved tended to demonstrate some tendency toward conformity, changing the height of the heels they purchased to be more in line with the purchases that people in their new homes were making.

But there was a crucial difference: That tendency to conform differed depending on the wealth of the places that the women were coming from, and the wealth of the places they were moving to. People conformed much more when they moved to a place with higher socioeconomic status, as the chart below shows. It didn't matter whether heels were higher or lower in the higher-class destination — in fact, they were about evenly split on that measure, Galak says.



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Offline dexter

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Re: What high heels say about the massive gap between the rich and the poor
« Reply #3 on: October 15, 2016, 05:27:51 pm »
this is really funny :D make me laugh out loud even in this condition :D

thanks :D  i really enjoyed it !!! what a perfect choice of pic :)



Come on, don't make me wait. Teach me more about economics.



What high heels and other shit say about the massive gap between the rich and the poor

[img[/img]http://Are the choices we make in our daily lives a result of our own innate desires, or a lemminglike drive to fit in?

When it comes to what to wear, people’s decisions are usually a mix of both. Fashion is undeniably about staying on trend and in step with those around you. But for many people, it’s also about expressing their own preferences and individuality.

Fashion may seem like a trivial subject, but Jeff Galak, a professor at Carnegie Mellon University’s Tepper School of Business, says that it provides an excellent measure for examining how people are influenced by those around them, and the lengths to which people go to conform. After all, Americans spend a huge amount of time and billions of dollars each year to keep up to date with fashions.

In a recent paper, Galak and three co-authors seek to examine how social conformity works by looking at one aspect of fashion that they can easily quantify: the height of women’s shoes. The researchers examine the height of shoes that more than 1,800 women purchased at an online luxury clothing retailer across America.

In particular, they look at women who move from one location to another in the United States, and analyze whether the height of the shoes they bought changed after they moved to be more similar to what women in their new area were purchasing. In total, they tracked nearly 15,000 shoe orders made over almost five years.

Pasr psychological studies have shown that the urge toward conformity is so powerful as to almost be irresistible. And Galak and his co-authors found that people who moved tended to demonstrate some tendency toward conformity, changing the height of the heels they purchased to be more in line with the purchases that people in their new homes were making.

But there was a crucial difference: That tendency to conform differed depending on the wealth of the places that the women were coming from, and the wealth of the places they were moving to. People conformed much more when they moved to a place with higher socioeconomic status, as the chart below shows. It didn't matter whether heels were higher or lower in the higher-class destination — in fact, they were about evenly split on that measure, Galak says.



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Offline behria

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Re: What high heels say about the massive gap between the rich and the poor
« Reply #4 on: October 15, 2016, 07:21:28 pm »
The pleasure is mine Sir. Thanks for the complement.



this is really funny :D make me laugh out loud even in this condition :D

thanks :D  i really enjoyed it !!! what a perfect choice of pic :)



Come on, don't make me wait. Teach me more about economics.



What high heels and other shit say about the massive gap between the rich and the poor

[img[/img]http://Are the choices we make in our daily lives a result of our own innate desires, or a lemminglike drive to fit in?

When it comes to what to wear, people’s decisions are usually a mix of both. Fashion is undeniably about staying on trend and in step with those around you. But for many people, it’s also about expressing their own preferences and individuality.

Fashion may seem like a trivial subject, but Jeff Galak, a professor at Carnegie Mellon University’s Tepper School of Business, says that it provides an excellent measure for examining how people are influenced by those around them, and the lengths to which people go to conform. After all, Americans spend a huge amount of time and billions of dollars each year to keep up to date with fashions.

In a recent paper, Galak and three co-authors seek to examine how social conformity works by looking at one aspect of fashion that they can easily quantify: the height of women’s shoes. The researchers examine the height of shoes that more than 1,800 women purchased at an online luxury clothing retailer across America.

In particular, they look at women who move from one location to another in the United States, and analyze whether the height of the shoes they bought changed after they moved to be more similar to what women in their new area were purchasing. In total, they tracked nearly 15,000 shoe orders made over almost five years.

Pasr psychological studies have shown that the urge toward conformity is so powerful as to almost be irresistible. And Galak and his co-authors found that people who moved tended to demonstrate some tendency toward conformity, changing the height of the heels they purchased to be more in line with the purchases that people in their new homes were making.

But there was a crucial difference: That tendency to conform differed depending on the wealth of the places that the women were coming from, and the wealth of the places they were moving to. People conformed much more when they moved to a place with higher socioeconomic status, as the chart below shows. It didn't matter whether heels were higher or lower in the higher-class destination — in fact, they were about evenly split on that measure, Galak says.



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Offline dexter

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Re: What high heels say about the massive gap between the rich and the poor
« Reply #5 on: October 18, 2016, 02:47:15 pm »


The pleasure is mine Sir. Thanks for the complement.



this is really funny :D make me laugh out loud even in this condition :D

thanks :D  i really enjoyed it !!! what a perfect choice of pic :)



Come on, don't make me wait. Teach me more about economics.



What high heels and other shit say about the massive gap between the rich and the poor

[img[/img]http://Are the choices we make in our daily lives a result of our own innate desires, or a lemminglike drive to fit in?

When it comes to what to wear, people’s decisions are usually a mix of both. Fashion is undeniably about staying on trend and in step with those around you. But for many people, it’s also about expressing their own preferences and individuality.

Fashion may seem like a trivial subject, but Jeff Galak, a professor at Carnegie Mellon University’s Tepper School of Business, says that it provides an excellent measure for examining how people are influenced by those around them, and the lengths to which people go to conform. After all, Americans spend a huge amount of time and billions of dollars each year to keep up to date with fashions.

In a recent paper, Galak and three co-authors seek to examine how social conformity works by looking at one aspect of fashion that they can easily quantify: the height of women’s shoes. The researchers examine the height of shoes that more than 1,800 women purchased at an online luxury clothing retailer across America.

In particular, they look at women who move from one location to another in the United States, and analyze whether the height of the shoes they bought changed after they moved to be more similar to what women in their new area were purchasing. In total, they tracked nearly 15,000 shoe orders made over almost five years.

Pasr psychological studies have shown that the urge toward conformity is so powerful as to almost be irresistible. And Galak and his co-authors found that people who moved tended to demonstrate some tendency toward conformity, changing the height of the heels they purchased to be more in line with the purchases that people in their new homes were making.

But there was a crucial difference: That tendency to conform differed depending on the wealth of the places that the women were coming from, and the wealth of the places they were moving to. People conformed much more when they moved to a place with higher socioeconomic status, as the chart below shows. It didn't matter whether heels were higher or lower in the higher-class destination — in fact, they were about evenly split on that measure, Galak says.



Relax their are abut 3,418,059,379 females other then you :)  © 2017